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Zeusenstein
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June 1 2017 3:50 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Post the last post on the previous page and below if gay
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August 25 2017 6:39 AM   QuickQuote Quote  




The war on wildlife in the United States

"...about last year’s wolf slaughter of the Profanity Peak wolfpack in Washington State. It was unjust, and it was unnecessary. It happened on remote, publicly owned lands in Colville National Forest... livestock get priority over native wildlife on public lands, and this slaughter took place on some of the best wolf habitat around. So, for starters, I had to ask, “If wolves can’t live there in peace, then where can they live?”

And last, but not least, there was an ominous issue involving academic freedom. 'Washington State University (WSU) silenced their top wolf researcher, Dr. Robert Wielgus, for speaking honestly to the press. They suppressed the fact that his remote surveillance video shows the rancher’s cattle grazing within several hundred feet of the wolves’ known den and rendezvous sites, as well as the salt blocks the rancher placed there to attract the cattle."

As the Profanity Peak wolfpack started killing cows, WDF&W protocols kicked in and the state launched a trapper and marksmen on the ground and in helicopters to kill the wolves. Wielgus told The Seattle Times and other media outlets that Len McIrvin, a partner in the Diamond M Ranch, “put his cattle on top of the den site.”

The implication was that the rancher — whose similar livestock losses in 2012 also led to the state killing the Wedge Valley wolfpack — has repeatedly and purposely put his animals in harm’s way to provoke the state protocols' ensuing kill orders like the one that eradicated the Profanity Peak pack. This practice of ecological entrapment in baiting wolves to attack livestock that ranchers are compensated for has proved to be a win/win strategy for wolf eradication efforts.

No charges of fraud have ever been filed against a rancher for doing this, nor has any attempt ever been made to recoup the compensation claims and cost of the state cullings which can run into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Critics claim that government officials tend to look the other way in cases involving their rancher constituents' criminal activity as they form powerful voting blocks.

In a letter of concern written into his personnel file, Wielgus was instructed by Ron Mittelhammer, the WSU Dean of the College of Agriculture, Human and Natural Resource Sciences to have no further contact with the media without first clearing his statements with WSU. Wielgus duly went silent as the furor raged.

For faculty at WSU, the message nonetheless was clear, said Donna Potts, president of the local chapter of the American Association of University Professors (AAUP), the nation’s oldest and largest advocacy group for academic freedom. “It was very disturbing; I had never seen anything like it,” Potts said of WSU’s treatment of a senior faculty member. Actions by state lawmakers and WSU administrators such as those taken against Wielgus can have a “chilling effect” on research that could be perceived as controversial, Cary Nelson, former national president of the AAUP said. Pressure from industry and from lawmakers friendly to it is nothing unusual, “but it’s up to a university to protect its faculty.”

The culling of the nearby Smackout Ravine wolfpack is currently underway."
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August 25 2017 10:05 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Half of all men are gay
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August 25 2017 10:05 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
But all men are half gay
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August 25 2017 10:05 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
All gay men are gay
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August 25 2017 10:06 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Half of all men are gay and half of all men are half gay
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October 20 2017 12:05 AM   QuickQuote Quote  






Entire Generation of Penguins Dies In 'Catastrophic' Antarctic Breeding Season


A colony of about 40,000 Adélie penguins in Antarctica has suffered a “catastrophic breeding event” – all but two chicks have died of starvation this year. It is the second time in just four years that such devastation – not previously seen in more than 50 years of observation – has been wrought on the population.

Ropert-Coudert said the region had been severely affected by the break-up of the Mertz glacier tongue in 2010, when a piece of ice almost the size of Luxembourg – about 80 km long and 40km wide – broke off. That event, which occurred about 250km from Petrels Island, had a big impact on ocean currents and ice formation in the region.

“The Mertz glacier impact on the region sets the scene in 2010 and when unusual meteorological events, driven by large climatic variations, hit in some years this leads to massive failures,” Ropert-Coudert told the Guardian. “In other words, there may still be years when the breeding will be OK, or even good for this colony, but the scene is set for massive impacts to hit on a more or less regular basis.”
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October 20 2017 12:15 AM   QuickQuote Quote  





Numbers of flying insects have declined by 75% in the past 27 years, with serious implications for all life on Earth and potential food chain collapse, scientists say pesticides likely cause

“Insects make up about two-thirds of all life on Earth. There has been some kind of horrific decline,” said Prof Dave Goulson of Sussex University, UK, part of the team behind the new study. “We appear to be making vast tracts of land inhospitable to most forms of life... If we lose the insects then everything is going to collapse.”

When the total weight of the insects in each sample was measured a startling decline was revealed. The annual average fell by 76% over the 27 year period, but the fall was even higher – 82% – in summer, when insect numbers reach their peak.

Previous reports of insect declines have been limited to particular insects, such European grassland butterflies, which have fallen by 50% in recent decades. But the new research captured all flying insects, including wasps and flies which are rarely studied, making it a much stronger indicator of decline.

The fact that the samples were taken in protected areas makes the findings even more worrying, said Caspar Hallmann at Radboud University, also part of the research team: “All these areas are protected and most of them are well-managed nature reserves. Yet, this dramatic decline has occurred.”

In September, a chief scientific adviser to the UK government warned that regulators around the world have falsely assumed that it is safe to use pesticides at industrial scales across landscapes and that the “effects of dosing whole landscapes with chemicals have been largely ignored”.
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