forum Politics and Society ›› Half of world's animals gone since 1970 ›› new reply Post Reply
Racer X
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February 10 2017 11:41 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
and these two are just ridiculous


Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
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February 11 2017 1:15 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
I read somewhere the hunter that killed Romeo specifically sought him out and killed him pretty much out of spite
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February 21 2017 11:59 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
I would not be surprised.
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February 22 2017 12:00 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
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February 22 2017 12:03 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
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March 8 2017 11:00 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
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March 25 2017 10:44 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
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March 25 2017 10:44 PM   QuickQuote Quote  





The U.S. Government Just Made It Legal To Shoot Hibernating Bear Families In Their Dens

WASHINGTON, March 21, 2017 /APNewswire


The U.S. Senate just voted 52-47 to allow barbaric hunting tactics such as killing hibernating bear families in their dens — and now the lives of countless animals on 76 million acres of federal wildlife refuges in Alaska are in President Donald Trump's hands.

Before the vote, U.S. Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ) said the bill contained "some of the most cruel and inhumane savage killing of animals."

Now the government is set to overturn previous U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) regulations that were put in place to protect our wildlife, allowing hunters to lure grizzly bears with food to shoot them at point-blank range. They will be able to legally enter bear and wolf dens to kill mothers and their young cubs and pups. Hunters will also be allowed to shoot bears from airplanes. Steel-jawed leghold traps and wire snares will be allowed on these national lands.

The resolution, S.J.Res.18, was introduced by U.S. House Representative Don Young (R-AK), a former trapper. Even though a 2016 poll of Alaska voters showed that most people agree that these cruel hunting practices should be banned, the measure passed through the House 225-193 last month, with some congressmen citing states' rights as the reason for their vote in favor, despite the resolution being about federal lands.

"What the Senate did today should outrage the conscience of every animal lover in America," Wayne Pacelle, president and CEO of The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), said on Tuesday, after the Senate passed the resolution.

The regulations came from the Obama administration, but received some bipartisan approval at the time. "Inhumane hunting methods have caused the overkilling of native Alaskan predators; this rule takes a balanced approach allowing for traditional, permit-based hunting," then-Representative Mike Fitzpatrick (R-PA) said last year after the cruel practices were banned.

But special interest groups have been seeking to strip the federal government of its authority over these lands. "Special interest groups are quietly working at the federal and state level to lay the groundwork for federally managed lands to be handed over wholesale to state or even private ownership," Dan Ashe, then-FWS director, wrote last year in an op-ed. "Unfortunately, without the protections of federal law and the public engagement it ensures, this heritage is incredibly vulnerable."

Jeff Flocken, North American Regional Director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), issued the following statement regarding the passage of S.J. Res.18 in the U.S. Senate:

"While America is celebrating the 114th anniversary of the National Wildlife Refuge System, the U.S. Senate has failed to take a stand for keystone species living on these same public lands. IFAW condemns the passage of S.J. Res. 18 and its House-passed counterpart, H.J. Res. 69, which allow for the killing of iconic animals including grizzlies and wolves—as well as their young—on federal refuge lands across Alaska. This lethal legislation will permit the use of barbaric devices like leg-hold traps, which can leave animals struggling and suffering for days, and neck snares that slowly strangle entangled wildlife—all for the purpose of artificially inflating "game" populations. To call these practices cruel is a vast understatement.

It is deeply concerning that the Senate has taken this step, placing Alaska's wildlife, habitat and ecological balance in jeopardy. Congress seems intent on doing anything but protecting wildlife on lands that have been set aside for that very purpose. Irresponsible policies like S.J. Res. 18/H.J. Res. 69 are not only threatening our native wildlife, but also clearing a path to the reintroduction of extremely inhumane, indiscriminate and unsporting hunting practices on our shared lands."
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