forum Politics and Society ›› NASA: Arctic Ice lowest ever, 'Inevitable death' ›› new reply Post Reply
Glogus_horn
Time Husk
200 Posts
22/M/NA


offline  mobile reply   (2)
November 16 2016 12:04 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
NASA- "We hate polar bears and hope they all die in the new ocean of fire"
Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,188 Posts
32/M/PA


offline  mobile reply   (11)
December 8 2016 8:24 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Nasa: entire planet gay
Goat Horse
Time Husk
660 Posts
49/M/NA


offline  mobile reply   (1)
December 9 2016 9:29 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
NASA: We have discovered a planet of faggots
Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,188 Posts
32/M/PA


offline  mobile reply   (11)
January 18 2017 4:31 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
NASA: arctic ice gayer than ever.
subduction megathrusts
Time Husk
245 Posts
21/M/NA


offline 
February 27 2018 10:50 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Ok so this is happening











Nearly a third of the ice covering the Bering Sea to the west of Alaska disappeared over an astonishing eight days in mid-February, according to a report
At a time when sea ice is supposed to be experiencing peak winter growth, coverage in the Bering Sea is now 60 percent below its 1981 to 2010 average.

The sun won’t rise at the North Pole until March 20, and it’s normally close to the coldest time of year, but an extraordinary and possibly historic thaw swelled over the tip of the planet this weekend. Analyses show that the temperature warmed to the melting point as an enormous storm pumped an intense pulse of heat through the Greenland Sea.

Temperatures may have soared as high as 35 degrees Fahrenheit (2 degrees Celsius) at the pole, according to the U.S. Global Forecast System model. While there are no direct measurements of temperature there, Zack Labe, a climate scientist working on his PhD at the University of California at Irvine, confirmed that several independent analyses showed “it was very close to freezing,” which is more than 50 degrees (30 degrees Celsius) above normal.

The warm intrusion penetrated right through the heart of the Central Arctic, Labe said. The temperature averaged for the entire region north of 80 degrees latitude spiked to its highest level ever recorded in February. The average temperature was more than 36 degrees (20 degrees Celsius) above normal. “No other warm intrusions were very close to this,” Labe said in an interview, describing a data set maintained by the Danish Meteorological Institute that dates back to 1958. “I was taken by surprise how expansive this warm intrusion was.”

Scientists were shocked in recent days to discover open water north of Greenland, an area normally covered by old, very thick ice. “This has me more worried than the warm temps in the Arctic right now,” tweeted Mike MacFerrin, an ice sheet specialist at the University of Colorado.

By the weekend, snow and temperatures of minus 5 degrees Celsius (23 degrees Fahrenheit) had hit Britain, while cities like Rome in southern Italy had transformed into a winter wonderland. This came soon after Moscow experienced a record whiteout during the "snowfall of the century."

But the weather situation looked very different high up in the polar ice cap, where it's actually supposed to be freezing cold. In northernmost Greenland, it was 6 degrees Celsius above zero on Sunday. And it's consistently been above zero for the last fortnight. Arctic sea ice has also been retreating at record rates.

"It's never been this high at this time of year," Mottram told DW. "It's never been this warm. It's really, really unprecedented, I would say."

Over the pole from Europe, nearly a third of the ice covering the Bering Sea to the west of Alaska has also disappeared. But this was no gradual process; the ice retreated over an astonishing eight days in mid-February, according to a report by Inside Climate News.

At a time when sea ice is supposed to be experiencing peak winter growth, coverage in the Bering Sea is now 60 percent below its 1981 to 2010 average.

Climate experts expressed shock at the level of Arctic warming. Robert Rohde, lead scientist at Berkeley Earth, a climate science consultancy in California, graphically illustrated the far northern temperature spike on socia media.

Lars Kaleschke, professor for sea ice remote sensing at the University of Hamburg, wrote in a tweet that he hadn't seen such temperatures in his 25 years of research.

The predominant theory revolves around a weakening of the so-called polar vortex — that is, the mass of freezing air held together above the Arctic during winter. That is also regulated by the jet stream — which itself has become irregular, due likely at least in part to climate change.

"High-pressure systems over Greenland and the European continent are funnelling warmer, lower pressure air northward, toward the North Pole," Kathryn Adamson, Senior Lecturer in Physical Geography, Manchester Metropolitan University, explained to DW.

This is causing the polar vortex to break up and split, the result being a mass of cold air moving south to Europe and North America.

But such "intrusion events" are happening with increasing frequency, says Adamson. And they "are linked to increased temperatures and reduced sea ice cover."

"There is now a large and strong body of evidence that the major changes we are seeing are linked to climate change," Adamson said. "Changes in one part of the ocean-atmosphere system can have major impacts on another."

Mottram agrees. While the polar vortex split is to some extent a normal weather event, the recent storms bringing warming air up the east and west Greenland coast "are being pumped up, probably by climate change," she said.

The warmer atmosphere is ultimately contributing to the increased frequency of these storms, and to the consistent weakening of the polar vortex.

Furthermore, there is open water north of Greenland where old, thick ice once stood. "This is extraordinary, it very very rarely happens," says Mottran.

Last August, Adamson wrote about the largest ever wildfire in Greenland, an event she partly attributed to climate change. Since 80 percent of Greenland is covered in ice, it also helps to moderate global temperatures by reflecting the sun's radiation.

As the Arctic warms at twice the rate as the rest of the planet, permafrost has also been thawing — which has unleashed a carbon feedback loop.

Newly exposed and dried out peat and biomass from thawed permafrost releases a large amount of climate change-inducing carbon, especially when it starts to to burn, releasing still more carbon.

Whether a blip or indicative of a new normal, scientists have uniformly expressed disbelief at the current Arctic temperatures and the state of the sea ice.

“This is a crazy winter,” said Alek Petty, a climate scientist at NASA, in an interview. “I don’t think we’re sensationalizing it.”

“It’s never been this extreme,” Mottram told Reuters.

click here for link
click here for link









The deadliest mass extinction 252 million years ago was also triggered by burning fossil fuels


"Research has shown that the Permian mass extinction event didn’t coincide with the start of the Siberian volcanic eruptions and lava flows, but rather 300,000 years later when the lava began to inject as sheets of magma underground, where Burger’s data suggests it ignited coal deposits.

The coal ignition triggered the series of events that led to Earth’s worst mass extinction. Its sulfur emissions created the acid rain that killed forests. Its carbon emissions acidified the oceans and warmed the planet, killing most marine life. The dead bodies fed bacteria that produced toxic hydrogen sulfide gas, which in turn killed off more species. The warming of the oceans produced a large methane release, which accelerated global warming faster yet.

Scientists are observing many of the same signs today. There’s more lighter carbon-12 in the atmosphere because the increase in atmospheric carbon levels is due to burning fossil fuels. There are an increasing number of dead zones in the oceans. As a result, the oceans are becoming increasingly acidic, and temperatures increasingly hot. Scientists today also worry about potentially large releases of methane from the ocean floor and a thawing Arctic, something that may have caused the Permian releases as well."
Long Dong Silver
Time Husk
94 Posts
21/M/NA


offline 
February 27 2018 11:03 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: Bashar al-Asad

Nasa: entire planet gay
.
subduction megathrusts
Time Husk
245 Posts
21/M/NA


offline 
June 4 2018 4:27 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Trump officials planning to spend $311 million-$11.8 billion a year to subsidize coal and nuclear energy plants from shutting


President Trump has ordered Energy Secretary Rick Perry to take immediate steps to help financially troubled coal and nuclear power plants.

"Unfortunately, impending retirements of fuel-secure power facilities are leading to a rapid depletion of a critical part of our nation's energy mix, and impacting the resilience of our power grid. President Trump has directed Secretary of Energy Rick Perry to prepare immediate steps to stop the loss of these resources, and looks forward to his recommendations," White House press secretary Sarah Sanders says in the statement.

Just a handful of companies stand to benefit significantly from the NOPR. NRG would be one of the biggest beneficiaries of the NOPR’s resulting subsidies for coal units, with increased revenue between $40 million and $1.2 billion per year. FirstEnergy and Dynegy would also stand to
benefit significantly, with potential additional revenue of up to $500 million per year. Under all
four readings, more than 80% of the coal subsidies paid by customers under DOE’s proposal would go to just five companies.


click here for link
forum Politics and Society ›› NASA: Arctic Ice lowest ever, 'Inevitable death' ›› new reply Post Reply

Quick Reply - RE: NASA: Arctic Ice lowest ever, 'Inevitable death'

Connect with Facebook to comment: Login w/FB

or Sign up free! - or login:







Subject


wrap selection with italics
wrap selection with bold
insert less than symbol
insert greater than symbol


google image Insert Google Images
Share a Band



Your ad here?