forum Politics and Society ›› Global Oceans Pollution Map ›› new reply Post Reply
Rats in the walls

crush, kill, destr
1,170 Posts
33/M/NY

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February 14 2008 10:44 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Global Human Influences On Ocean Ecosystems Mapped

ScienceDaily (Feb. 14, 2008) - For a bird's-eye view of human impacts on the Earth, scientists can study satellite images showing the continents in mottled colors that correspond to vegetation, desertification or human habitation.

But those photos cannot tell them much about the big blue mystery, oceans, and how human activities affect them.

Now, a team of researchers has constructed the first global map of human influences on marine ecosystems by gathering and interpreting massive amounts of data from the professional literature and from researchers around the world.

This study suggests that about 41 percent of oceans bear a serious human "footprint " and that few blue spots on our planet are likely pristine, less than 4 percent.

"A series of papers have highlighted the role humans are having on the degradation of the oceans, through specific activities," said Fiorenza Micheli, an associate professor of biology at Stanford.

"It's timely to put it all together-to show how all the different effects sum up."

Micheli said maps of human influence should "guide ocean zoning and management of coastal waters."

Scientists increasingly advocate zoning oceans to protect the hidden ecosystems below the surface.

"By seeing where different activities occur and whether they occur in sensitive ecosystems, we can design management strategies aimed at shifting activities away from the most sensitive areas," Micheli said.

The researchers compiled data on 17 different human impacts to oceans, including fishing, coastal development, fertilizer runoff and pollution from shipping traffic.

Previous studies have worked on a smaller scale, or have focused on only one ecosystem or human activity, examining a single piece of the global puzzle.

To make the picture complete, Micheli and her colleagues built a global map detailing how these numerous human impacts would add up and affect 20 types of ecosystems.

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coastal elite
hates chicken.
15,889 Posts
30/F/DC


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February 15 2008 9:05 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Here's the map, for anyone who doesn't want to click through. Pretty gross even on a non-environmentalist front.
i
und keine eier
938 Posts
38/M/PA


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February 15 2008 4:42 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
That's gnasty.
Racer X
lost in the ether
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February 16 2008 12:53 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
yuck.
Tml Matus
(+[ ]+)
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30/M/FL


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February 16 2008 2:39 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
awesome
acabamento
__________________
5,351 Posts
34/M/GA


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February 16 2008 2:41 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
click here for link -click daily, and all sister sites daily
click here for link -click each project daily
click here for link -click (guess how often) daily

Instead of posting depressing images of terrible things, how about you also provide some ways to help out?
i
und keine eier
938 Posts
38/M/PA


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February 16 2008 8:53 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by:acabamento

click here for link -click daily, and all sister sites daily
click here for link -click each project daily
click here for link -click (guess how often) daily

Instead of posting depressing images of terrible things, how about you also provide some ways to help out?

Thanks for the links, the only one I had was therainforestsite...
coastal elite
hates chicken.
15,889 Posts
30/F/DC


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February 16 2008 9:13 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by:acabamento

click here for link -click daily, and all sister sites daily
click here for link -click each project daily
click here for link -click (guess how often) daily

Instead of posting depressing images of terrible things, how about you also provide some ways to help out?


Easy: using more reusable items (cloth bags, never using disposable utensils, etc.); recycling, especially plastic; eating local and/or organic (check where your organics come from though - anything outside the country is worthless. CSAs are almost everywhere though); eating less processed foods; unplugging your electronics.
Harder: going vegetarian or vegan; composting; living in the smallest space possible.
Hardest: moving into an urban environment; investing in a good bike or comfortable walking shoes and selling your car (zipcars/flexcars are available in almost every city incase of emergency); solar panels or windmills - go as far off the grid as possible.


A lot of the problems with pollution in the air and water is because we waste so much energy here on land.
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
1,170 Posts
33/M/NY


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February 23 2008 12:08 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by:acabamento

Instead of posting depressing images of terrible things, how about you also provide some ways to help out?




You have to know the details and scope of a problem before you can appropriately address it. I'm not sure this one is getting fixed that easy as going to a website and clicking on a link.
Lilybelle
diving for pearls
589 Posts
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August 10 2009 2:25 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by:i

That's gnasty.

Aldo Leopold
...
87 Posts
20/M/NA


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May 8 2018 3:54 AM   QuickQuote Quote  


Plastic fibres found in 83% of tap water around the world

The US had the highest contamination rate, at 94%, with plastic fibres found in tap water sampled at sites including Congress buildings, the US Environmental Protection Agency’s headquarters, and Trump Tower in New York. Lebanon and India had the next highest rates.

European nations including the UK, Germany and France had the lowest contamination rate, but this was still 72%.

Microplastics are also known to contain and absorb toxic chemicals and research on wild animals shows they are released in the body. Prof Richard Thompson, at Plymouth University, UK, told Orb: “It became clear very early on that the plastic would release those chemicals and that actually, the conditions in the gut would facilitate really quite rapid release.” His research has shown microplastics are found in a third of fish caught in the UK.

The study found that the most commonly produced plastics absorbed the most chemicals, and for longer periods of time than previously thought.

The scale of global microplastic contamination is only starting to become clear, with studies in Germany finding fibres and fragments in all of the 24 beer brands they tested, as well as in honey and sugar. In Paris in 2015, researchers discovered microplastic falling from the air, which they estimated deposits three to 10 tonnes of fibres on the city each year, and that it was also present in the air in people’s homes.

France banned most single-use plastic products with a law going into effect in 2020. The throwaway consumer culture is the greatest contributor to ocean plastic pollution, which has become so pervasive that plastic is expected to outweigh all the fish in the sea by 2050.

A separate small study in the Republic of Ireland released in June also found microplastic contamination in a handful of tap water and well samples. “We don’t know what the [health] impact is and for that reason we should follow the precautionary principle and put enough effort into it now, immediately, so we can find out what the real risks are,” said Dr Anne Marie Mahon at the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, who conducted the research.

Mahon said there were two principal concerns: very small plastic particles and the chemicals or pathogens that microplastics can harbour. “If the fibres are there, it is possible that the nanoparticles are there too that we can’t measure,” she said. “Once they are in the nanometre range they can really penetrate a cell and that means they can penetrate organs, and that would be worrying.” The Orb analyses caught particles of more than 2.5 microns in size, 2,500 times bigger than a nanometre.

Microplastics can attract bacteria found in sewage, Mahon said: “Some studies have shown there are more harmful pathogens on microplastics downstream of wastewater treatment plants.”





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