forum Politics and Society ›› the new pope ›› new reply Post Reply
Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,081 Posts
31/M/PA


offline   (11)
December 28 2013 2:08 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: capn merika

ever since he made those comments i've been sending him a really awful tweet a day


lol
Jason Voorheees
dogfood meatballs
6,457 Posts
40/M/NY


offline   (4)
December 28 2013 2:30 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: crunkmoose

Originally posted by: capn merika

Go figure a fat piece of shit would disagree with an unselfish call for empathy and compassion.



Don't forget philandering drug criminal, and sex tourist.



i don't care if someone uses drugs, i don't care if someone uses hookers, i don't even care if someone cheats on their spouse - she could be just as contemptible as he is - she did agree to marry him, and i'm guessing it wasn't for his compassion.

what i do care about is someone using their influence over a voting block in the most powerful country in the world to get them to do evil, shitty things that affect the entire planet and everything in it. "unfettered u.s. capitalism" doesn't just hurt the poor in this country, it affects lives all around the world. it creates foreign sweatshops, it corrupts foreign governments and props up foreign dictatorships and mafias, it pollutes foreign land, water, and air, it deforests foreign wilderness and destroys habitat, and it runs foreign wildlife into extinction.

what he does with his dick or his brain chemistry doesn't interest me in the least.
Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,081 Posts
31/M/PA


offline   (11)
December 28 2013 2:46 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
the new poop
Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,081 Posts
31/M/PA


offline   (11)
December 28 2013 2:47 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: capn merika

im going to try and run him into suicide. i wish rich people didn't have security.

he probably doesnt even read his twitter
Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,081 Posts
31/M/PA


offline   (11)
December 28 2013 2:50 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
so fat and gay i had to hire a dedicated tweetcrafter to post my horrid opinions and ideas
Bashar al-Asad
In sha'Allah
38,081 Posts
31/M/PA


offline   (11)
December 28 2013 3:15 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
the new pjope
crunkmoose
Fuck Nazis.
24,526 Posts
61/M/MA


offline   (9)
December 29 2013 10:41 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Originally posted by: Jason Voorheees

Originally posted by: crunkmoose

Originally posted by: capn merika

Go figure a fat piece of shit would disagree with an unselfish call for empathy and compassion.



Don't forget philandering drug criminal, and sex tourist.



i don't care if someone uses drugs, i don't care if someone uses hookers, i don't even care if someone cheats on their spouse - she could be just as contemptible as he is - she did agree to marry him, and i'm guessing it wasn't for his compassion.

what i do care about is someone using their influence over a voting block in the most powerful country in the world to get them to do evil, shitty things that affect the entire planet and everything in it. "unfettered u.s. capitalism" doesn't just hurt the poor in this country, it affects lives all around the world. it creates foreign sweatshops, it corrupts foreign governments and props up foreign dictatorships and mafias, it pollutes foreign land, water, and air, it deforests foreign wilderness and destroys habitat, and it runs foreign wildlife into extinction.

what he does with his dick or his brain chemistry doesn't interest me in the least.



When he has taken the stances Limbaugh has in the past about those things, he opens his actions to condemnation equal to that he proposes for others.
Jason Voorheees
dogfood meatballs
6,457 Posts
40/M/NY


offline   (4)
December 30 2013 6:58 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
oh yeah, he is obviously a hypocrite, as are most holier-than-thou, self-righteous, assholes who seek to modulate the behavior of others, especially in the direction of repressing it, a la puritanism.

i just think it's too easy to let the lurid details of his personal life distract from the truly malignant, far reaching and lasting damage the policies he advocates cause in the world outside his air conditioned hotel room. i honestly don't care about anyone's kinks; doing the exact thing you publicly say is wrong is a pretty common one actually, and one that is hilariously endemic to that particular right wing subculture. but that's chickenshit compared to something like him using his tremendous influence to advocate for deregulated industry here and abroad, and the effects that has and will have for generations to come, and for everything that will die in the process. his dick is the least of our problems.
Jason Voorheees
dogfood meatballs
6,457 Posts
40/M/NY


offline   (4)
December 30 2013 9:50 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
.




Edward Snowden and Pope Francis Broke America’s Political Deadlock in 2013

By Peter Beinart
thedailybeast.com December 30th 2013

On poverty and surveillance, Democrats and Republicans finally found some common ground.

In 2012, Barack Obama travelled the country promising that if he defeated Mitt Romney, in 2013 the Republican Party’s “fever may break.” Didn’t happen. In 2013, the GOP Congress remained just as hostile to Obamacare, citizenship for illegal immigrants, and a budget deal that includes higher taxes as it had in 2012. That’s the bad news. The good news is that in two areas, 2013 did witness a potential break in the Verdun-like standoff between America’s two parties. And the two men most responsible were completely unknown a year ago and don’t even reside in the United States: Edward Snowden and the Pope.

First, Snowden. For a few years now, it’s been clear that while Cheneyism still dominates the Republican foreign policy elite, many grassroots conservatives are less than thrilled about a permanent, wildly expensive “war on terror” that gives the federal government virtually unchecked power to spy on Americans. By exposing the breathtaking reach of National Security Agency surveillance, Snowden empowered these conservative insurgents. In July, despite the unified opposition of House GOP leaders, 94 House Republicans voted to limit NSA spying. According to the Pew Research Center, the percentage of Republicans who believe the government has gone too far in restricting civil liberties has jumped 18 points since 2010, and now exceeds the level among Democrats.

Spying divides Democrats along similar lines. The party’s foreign policy elites are more willing to trust the NSA with vast surveillance powers, at least when they control the White House. And Democratic leaders don’t want to jeopardize their success in overcoming the party’s reputation as “soft on terror.” But as in the GOP, the further you get from the centers of governmental power, the unhappier Democrats are with NSA spying.

It’s now possible to imagine the surveillance issue dividing insiders from outsiders in the 2016 primaries in both parties. Chris Christie and Rand Paul have already begun sparring over the issue. And it’s a good bet that whoever challenges Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination will take a harder line against the Obama administration’s record on spying and drones. Despite the depressingly static nature of Washington partisan conflict, America’s national security debate is being scrambled in ways not seen since 9/11. And Snowden is a big part of the reason why.

The other figure scrambling Washington debates in a way Obama can’t is Pope Francis. First of all, he’s helping bury the culture war. It’s harder to claim that secular liberals threaten Christianity when they’re madly applauding the most prominent Christian leader in the world, and he’s applauding back. Second, Francis is fueling a debate about economic inequality and government’s responsibility to the poor. That’s mildly uncomfortable for Democrats, who since the Clinton era have been more comfortable talking about the problems of the middle class, and whose policy wonks generally believe it’s necessary to cut entitlements. But the really interesting impact is on the GOP. Because Francis is probably the non-American who Republican elites revere most, and because he stands outside Washington’s partisan scrum, his focus on poverty is convincing some GOP leaders that they should focus on it too. From Ralph Reed to Newt Gingrich to Paul Ryan, prominent Republicans have begun talking about remaking their party in Francis’s image. It’s unclear if they mean real policy change, or mere rebranding. But even if leading Republicans merely shift away from the radically individualistic, Tea Party-esque message of recent years to something closer to George W. Bush’s “compassionate conservatism,” it would change the tenor of America’s economic debate in ways we haven’t seen since the financial crisis hit.

If you look at American politics from the inside-outside out—at the fights over Obamacare, the budget and the confirmation of nominees—it looks predictable and depressing. But if you look from the outside-in, you can see the way forces beyond the Beltway are remaking the terms of Washington debate.
Jason Voorheees
dogfood meatballs
6,457 Posts
40/M/NY


offline   (4)
January 16 2014 1:55 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
Pope Francis Names 19 New Cardinals, Focusing On The Poor

AP

January 16, 2014 03:08

VATICAN CITY (AP) -- Pope Francis named his first batch of cardinals on Sunday, choosing 19 men from Asia, Africa, Latin America and elsewhere, including the developing nations of Haiti and Burkina Faso, in line with his belief that the church must pay more attention to the poor.

Francis made the announcement as he spoke from his studio window to a crowd in St. Peter's Square.

Sixteen of the appointees are younger than 80, meaning they are currently eligible to elect the next pope, which is a cardinal's most important task. The ceremony to formally install them as cardinals will be held Feb. 22 at the Vatican.

Since his election in March as the first pontiff from Latin America, the pope has broken tradition after tradition in terms of protocol and style at the Vatican.

And in a move to restore the reputation of the Vatican's Bank, Pope Francis also reshuffled most of the cardinals from the oversight body of the institution, replacing all but one of predecessor Pope Benedict XVI's appointments.

On February 16, 2013, a few days before announcing his resignation, Pope Benedict XVI had confirmed the members of the supervisory board of the bank for five years. Among them was the assistant secretary of state, Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone, who has been widely accused by many for the administrative failures of the Vatican under the rule of Pope Benedict.

The cardinals’ commission is tasked with approval of the overall strategy of the institution including charity work as well as reviewing accounts. It is a de facto link between the Pope and the board of superintendence, consisting of five lay men from around the world. Last February, Ernst Von Freyberg was appointed as the new president of the bank.

Pope Francis has practically canceled the decree of Benedict, replacing Bertone and other members of the committee in charge of reforming the bank formerly known as the Institute for Religious Works (IOR). In the middle of 2013, Pope Francis appointed a trusted friend, Monsignor Battista Ricca, to occupy the post of supervisor and appointed an independent commission of inquiry to examine the activities of the bank and its legal status.

His team shut down many of the suspicious accounts held in the bank and asked the Promontory Financial Group to audit the institution and bring it up to international standards.

Pope Francis has vowed to reform the bank or close it down completely after a series of scandals that tainted the reputation of the Holy Sea and the institution responsible for its charity around the globe.

Last July, IOR director Paolo Cipriani and deputy-director Massimo Tulli resigned, three days after the arrest of Vatican accountant Monsignor Nunzio Scarano on charges of plotting to smuggle 20 million euros ($26 million) into Italy from Switzerland.

Dubbed "Monsignor 500", the man is currently on trial in Rome on the smuggling charge and is also under investigation for money-laundering Vatican accounts.

In a 2010 scandal, Italian police seized 23 million euros from an IOR account. At the same time authorities launched an investigation against IOR's then-president, Gotti Tedeschi and director Paolo Cipriani for alleged money laundering from a Vatican account at an Italian bank. The money was later unfrozen and Gotti Tedeschi was exonerated as a suspect, while Cipriani hasn't been charged.
Rats in the walls
crush, kill, destr
1,170 Posts
33/M/NY


offline   (1)
January 20 2015 12:39 AM   QuickQuote Quote  







Pope upholds ban on contraception

Nicole Winfield, The Associated Press
Published Monday, January 19, 2015

Pope Francis is firmly upholding church teaching banning contraception, but said Monday that Catholics don't have to breed "like rabbits" and should instead practice "responsible parenting."

Speaking to reporters en route home from the Philippines, Francis said there are plenty of church-approved ways to regulate births. But he said most importantly, no outside institution should impose its views on regulating family size, blasting what he called the "ideological colonization" of the developing world.

African bishops, in particular, have long complained about how progressive, Western ideas about birth control and gay rights are increasingly being imposed on the developing world by groups, institutions or individual nations, often as a condition for development aid.

"Every people deserves to conserve its identity without being ideologically colonized," Francis said.

His comments, taken together with his defence of the Catholic Church's ban on artificial contraception during the trip, signal that he is increasingly showing his more conservative bent, which has largely been ignored by public opinion or obscured by a media narrative that has tended to highlight his populist persona.

On the trip, Francis gave his strongest defence yet of the 1968 encyclical Humanae Vitae, which enshrined the church's opposition to artificial birth control. He warned against "insidious attacks" against the family -- a reference to gay marriage proposals -- echoing language often used by overwhelmingly conservative U.S. bishops. And he insisted that "openness to life is a condition of the sacrament of matrimony."

At the same time, however, he said it's not true that to be a good Catholic "you have to be like rabbits." On the contrary, he said "responsible parenthood" requires that couples regulate the births of their children, as church teaching allows. He cited the case of a woman he met who was pregnant with her eighth child after seven Cesarean sections.

"That is an irresponsibility!" he said. The woman might argue that she should trust in God. "But God gives you methods to be responsible," he said.

He said there are many "licit" ways of regulating births that are approved by the church, an apparent reference to the Natural Family Planning method of monitoring a woman's cycle to avoid intercourse when she is ovulating.

During the Vatican's recent meeting on the family, African bishops denounced how aid groups and lending institutions often condition their assistance on a country's compliance with their ideals: allowing health care workers to distribute condoms, or withdrawing assistance if legislation discriminating against gays is passed.

"When imposed conditions come from imperial colonizers, they search to make people lose their own identity and make a sameness," he said. "This is ideological colonization."





re: every catholic mission in every country ever






crunkmoose
Fuck Nazis.
24,526 Posts
61/M/MA


offline   (9)
January 20 2015 11:33 AM   QuickQuote Quote  
Pope upholds ban on contraception? Thats not a problem (except for areas where AIDS is still a massive problem and the church still wants to keep people from using condoms), as in America over 90 percent of female catholics use birth control at some point in their lives anyway.

Also, lets not overlook everyone's favorite Ill Papa coming out AGAINST free speech when it comes to criticizing religion... and his thoroughly un-christian "If you say a curse word against my mother, I will punch you" remark.

It wasn't about this Pope or this subject, buuut Tim Minchin said it best.

WREN
Pulp Free
52,190 Posts
35/M/PA


offline   (20)
January 20 2015 1:46 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
I guess I can understand the mindset of not wanting people to criticize religion but to use the killings in Paris as a platform to make that statement was ill advised. No one wants their beliefs to be ridiculed but as a Christian would say, you need to learn to turn the other cheek. It would have been better had he stated that and condemned the killings. Alas, he didn't.

As far as punching the person who insulted his mother, I kind of like that he said that. It makes the Pope human instead of the untouchable voice of god that he's believed to be. If I was a Catholic, I'd kind of want to know that he's a bit like me instead of this mythological being. That's just me.
WREN
Pulp Free
52,190 Posts
35/M/PA


offline   (20)
January 20 2015 1:47 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
And the Catholic Church still hating on contraception is so dumb. With all the progressive stances he's been taking since he took the position, you'd think this one would be an easy change for the church. Much easier than accepting gays. While, I like a lot of what this Pope has been trying to do, I still think the Catholic Church is a giant shit show.
Davey.
Baby Cole
43,509 Posts
32/M/NA


offline  mobile reply   (13)
January 20 2015 1:48 PM   QuickQuote Quote  
The pope isn't supposed to show reactionary human emotion. He is God's representative on earth, and Jesus tells us to turn the other cheek.
forum Politics and Society ›› the new pope ›› new reply Post Reply

Quick Reply - RE: the new pope

Connect with Facebook to comment: Login w/FB

or Sign up free! - or login:







Subject


wrap selection with italics
wrap selection with bold
insert less than symbol
insert greater than symbol


google image Insert Google Images
Share a Band



Your ad here?